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The Possibility Podcast Episode 006: Raising Resilient Children

Mel says, “As a culture we tend to focus on the achievement and success of our children but omit something far more important; their resilience.”

In this episode, Mel describes what he means by the word resilience, which he says is the source of our children’s well-being. He explains that the parenting rulebook — as we know it — fails us. Assisting our offspring to develop emotional intelligence is best accomplished by sharing more of our own life narrative, not just the good but our challenges as well.

Mel shares a compelling narrative about his own son regarding grades and motivation, and has a call-in from an educational counselor. He proposes that the intense pressure we put on children to perform academically at young ages is akin to unintentional child abuse. He highlights the path for nurturing your children to develop authentic self-esteem.

Check out the companion article to this episode!

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Raising Resilient Children

Resilient ChildAs parents, no matter how devoted and nurturing we may be, our children often struggle with low self-esteem, anxiety, depression, and a host of other challenges. Some of these disturbances are simply life experiences that they may regrettably have to experience. Our goal is to feel confident that they will overcome these obstacles and that our kids will even grow stronger for that success. To achieve that end, we need to provide them with the skills to be resilient, to bounce back from these assaults on their wellbeing and ultimately to thrive in their lives. We can provide them with the foundation to do so if we rethink our relationship with them. If our best intentions are not producing the expected results, we need to examine our operating beliefs. We may be playing from the wrong game plan.

We’re typically comfortable sharing our strengths, values, and ideals with our offspring. We assume that doing so will enable them to follow our guidance and propel them in the right direction. But the tendency for many parents is to openly share their positive attributes but withhold the personal history of their life’s struggles and upsets. We may say that they don’t want to burden our children with our problems – past or present. Or we simply don’t want to present ourselves in a way that is inconsistent with what we try to model. Ironically, when we share only the good with our children, we deprive them of a realistic expectation and preparation for what likely lies ahead.

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